H O M E  P A G E


MESSAGE BOARD


FACEBOOK


REPORTS FROM THE RECORDER & ADVERTISING RATES

The Riddlesdown Recorder
 On Line


PLANNING APPLICATIONS

Weekly Planning List

Streets A-L


Streets M-Z


Non-residential Nearby


PLANNING ADVICE ON

Planning Applications


Building Control Applications


USEFUL LOCAL INFORMATION & LINKS

Croydon Council Facilities,

Council Information, MP

and Contact Details


Information on Local Healthcare, Leisure,

Facilities & Shops


Police Contact Numbers;

CBNWA Crime

and Scam Information


Transport - Rail, Road & Bus Information & Reports


Events


Community Page
(Things to do, join and help with)


ABOUT THE

RIDDLESDOWN

RESIDENTS’ ASSOCIATION

A Brief History


The RRA Area


The Committee


Collegiate Liaison Officer


RRA AGM Minutes


Latest accounts


Archive


History from the Recorder


ABOUT RIDDLESDOWN
AND ITS COMMON

A Description


Short Walks and Teas


Picture Gallery


CONTACT US



Privacy Statement & GDPR


Terms of Use

Founded 1937

Riddlesdown Collegiate - Updated 19/11/18


Further information about the Collegiate can be obtained from the Collegiate’s website - Link

Chief Executive - The Collegiate Trust; Mr Gordon Smith

Principal of Riddlesdown Collegiate; Mr Soumick Dey



Stolen Mini buses

New 15/11/18


We have been made aware today by the Principal, that two of their minibuses were stolen from the school site on Sunday evening (11 Nov). CCTV footage shows three men arriving in a van just before 8.30pm, then jump over the gate, tamper with it, approach the minibuses, appear to open them easily with a device and drive off. It looks like an organised, professional job. One of the minibuses was abandoned in Biggin Hill and has since been recovered. Seemingly in the same condition as it would have been when stolen. The other minibus is still missing (and, quite possibly, has been resprayed and sold by now!).


It is very doubtful if the other mini bus is still in the area but you never know. It is a usual tactic for vehicles to be stolen and then left somewhere else for a few days for the gang to see if a tracker device is fitted and for the owner/Police to recover it.


More info from the Met Police on vehicle crime prevention



Riddlesdown Collegiate Term Dates

Information below, taken from Riddlesdown Collegiate website (19/11/18).
Term dates

End of Autumn Term - Friday 21 December 2018

Start of Spring Term - Monday 7 January 2019

Half Term - Monday 18 February 2019 to Friday 22 February 2019 (inclusive)

End of Spring Term - Friday 5 April 2019

Start of Summer Term - Tuesday 23 April 2019

Half Term - Monday 27 May 2019 to Friday 31 May 2019 (inclusive)

End of Summer Term - Tuesday 23 July 2019

Start of Autumn Term - Wednesday 4 September 2019

Half Term - Monday 21 October 2019 to Friday 1 November 2019 (inclusive)

End of Autumn Term - Friday 20 December 2019

Start of Spring Term - Monday 6 January 2020


School Times and Facilities

Normal school day timings;

Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 8.30am – 2.40pm

Tuesday, Thursday: 8.30am – 3.30pm (times were previously 8.45am start to 3.25pm finish)

However, there are various after school clubs (and some weekend activities), meaning that some schoolchildren pass through Riddlesdown later than these times.

The 6th Form pupils also pass through Riddlesdown at different times, depending on when they have lessons and breaks during the day. There are also some ‘holiday clubs’ running in the school holidays. These are listed on the Collegiate website.


Prospective Parents/Pupils Open Evening 20 September 2018

Posted 23/9/18


Following the number of comments (on our Facebook page and e-mails received) about the Open Evening at Riddlesdown Collegiate on Thursday 20 September, and the resulting traffic chaos on a number of surrounding streets, the RRA contacted Soumick Dey, the Principal at the Collegiate on 21 September.


Photo below  taken in Ingleboro Drive at 8pm

























Some comments were favourable but many were not. We appreciate the gas works and one way system on Derwent Drive caused more issues than in previous years.


We did ask the Principal why the RRA were not advised of the Open Evening so we could tell local residents, via various forums. Only some homes near to the Collegiate received letters. We also asked why it appeared staff were not controlling the traffic better first thing in the evening, rather than leaving it until late on. On another issue, we also took up with him about the comments of there being no staff at bus stops on Mitchley Ave at the end of the school day and the disruption for residents/elderly trying to get on the buses. In addition, a few comments were made that some drivers are not stopping at bus stops at the end of the school day even though the buses are not full.


We have received a very prompt response from him and this is part of the Principal's response:


"I am sorry that last night’s Open Evening caused such problems on local streets – we had even more visitors than in previous years and, as you have mentioned, the roadworks made things even more difficult. We did drop letters on local roads and advertise the event on our website, through our newsletters and through social media, but it was remiss of me not to inform you (RRA) directly – apologies for that.


Any staff cars parked on Honister Heights were moved onto our site and cones were placed along that road to prevent stopping or parking. Sadly, I understand that some motorists ignored these cones, either driving over them or discarding them to the side of the road. Whilst we did have staff outside of the school gates and down Honister Heights throughout the evening, with the number of visitors on site, we were unable to provide more staff to marshall traffic further down Ingleboro or Buttermere. We would be grateful for the support of local police but have been informed in recent years that they would be unable to offer their assistance at such an event. Towards the end of the evening, about ten members of staff spent over an hour directing traffic and, in the circumstances, did an excellent job – I am pleased that some residents appreciated this.


The growing popularity of the Collegiate, together with the impact of the gasworks, made for an extremely busy evening. In future, I will be sure to inform you directly and we will continue to review our operation and consider how we might reduce such problems next time. I would be pleased to hear any further suggestions you may have. It may be, for example, that some residents themselves would be happy to volunteer their support to help marshall traffic – if so, I would be pleased to hear from them.


I am disappointed, also, to hear of your concern about some students’ behaviour at the Lower Barn Road bus stop. When students have been waiting for a bus for a long time, and especially when perhaps one or two buses have already driven past full, I understand their frustration and eagerness to board the next bus, but this does not excuse any form of anti-social behaviour and we remind them of this regularly. There are two or three senior staff at the bus stops every day after school – they go between the seven bus stops on that stretch and even ride the buses between stops to help to make sure that students are boarding sensibly, using all the space on board and managing to get home quickly.


For your reference, I have listed below (photo) the details of some significant events at the Collegiate this term – whilst none of these events will attract the number of visitors that we did last night, I thought it might be useful to let you know about them, especially during the period of the gasworks. From this list, I would expect the Entrance Exam to cause the most traffic on Saturday 6th October 2018. As a result of our growing popularity, we have seen a record number of applications for the test this year and so we will almost certainly need to operate more than one sitting. We will finalise the details next week after the deadline for applications has passed."


Does anyone have any suggestions as to how this traffic situation could be improved in future years? And is anyone willing to act as a traffic marshall for the Collegiate? If so please contact Soumick Dey at the Collegiate direct. This will have to be an arrangement direct with the Collegiate and not through the RRA.

The RRA and a number of residents believe that this Open Evening may have been come too large now for the narrow streets leading up to the cul-de-sac of Dunmail Drive and we believe it should be staggered over a couple of evenings in future.


It looks as if Saturday 6 October will be the next major event taking place at the Collegiate.


As far as the buses are concerned, the RRA are closely monitoring the situation at the moment following the change of bus timetables/routes on 1 September and we have taken this point up about some drivers not stopping at bus stops with Arriva buses.




New Primary School for Croydon - Updated 12/4/17

The Collegiate Trust have issued a press release regarding a new primary free school. The Collegiate’s application to the Department for Education was successful but a new school will not be built on the Riddlesdown site.

“The Department for Education (DFE) today (12/4/17) announced that the Collegiate Free Primary School has been approved to open in Croydon. This new primary school, to be established and run by The Collegiate Trust, will be developed over the coming years and will take in 60 children per year; we will announce an opening date as soon as we are able to do so.

The site of the school is yet to be finalised. The Trust originally intended to collocate the new school on site with Riddlesdown Collegiate, an area with need for further primary places. However, we have now agreed with the DFE to develop the school in an area of greater need for additional primary provision.”

This is the full press release


Update 10/9/16

For those of you who have children at Riddlesdown Collegiate, you may have picked up the following on this week's newsletter from the Collegiate;


“I am delighted to announce that one of the developments we are currently considering is a new, 2 - form entry primary school which could be located on or very close to the Riddlesdown Collegiate site. Croydon Council needs 60 additional places for Reception and beyond, beginning in September 2018, and The Collegiate Trust is the perfect partner to achieve this. Of course we need to consult with you on this and further information will be available on our Trust website www.tct-academies.org by Wednesday 14th September when you will have the opportunity to tell us what you think.”

https://www.riddlesdown.org/Media/Friday%209th%20September%202016.pdf


Update 12/6/16

This page covers news and information from the Riddlesdown Collegiate. Many residents will have previously known the School, by the name of Riddlesdown High School. The School changed it’s name in September 2009. The Collegiate is now broken down into four Colleges of about 400 pupils each, plus a Creative and Performing Arts College and a 6th Form College.

This Collegiate is now the largest School within the London Borough of Croydon, with nearly 2,000 pupils attending it and about 200 staff. Our Chairman Brian Longman, is the RRA Riddlesdown Collegiate Liaison Officer. Brian has a lot of contact with the Chief Executive of the Collegiate Trust; Gordon Smith and the Collegiate Principal Soumick Dey and he liaises on a regular basis with them.  

If any local resident(s) have concerns about the behaviour of children entering and leaving the Collegiate, litter, or large events that the School hold, etc, then please feel free to contact Brian. via our e-mail address Riddlesdownresidents@gmail.com or look on the inside page of The Recorder magazine.


Collegiate Report (from The Riddlesdown Recorder- Autumn 2018)

Soumick Dey – Principal


As we prepare to embark on another academic year at Riddlesdown Collegiate, we are celebrating another set of fantastic exam results this summer. At A Level, almost half of all grades were A*-B and 12 students achieved straight A/A* grades in at least 3 subjects. The vast majority of them have been successful in gaining places at their first choice university and we wish them the very best of luck as they begin the next chapter of their lives. Meanwhile, at GCSE, students achieved outstanding results with 92% passing English at grade 4 or better and 80% passing Maths at grade 4 or better.


Overall, 78% of students achieved at least a “standard pass”(grade 4) in both English and Maths, whilst 62% achieved at least a “strong pass”(grade 5) in both English and Maths. At the top end, more than a quarter of all grades were 9-7 (or A*/A), including 132 grade 9s – aimed at the top 2% nationally – in total.


Despite the difficulty of new GCSE specifications and assessments, most of which were examined for the first time this year, students at the Collegiate have excelled and achieved a record number of top grades across the full range of subjects. Consequently, more students have met the criteria for College VI and have been offered places to continue their successful studies at the Collegiate. We look forward to acknowledging our highest achievers at our annual Celebration Evening in September.


During the summer term, following internal exams, we took the opportunity to recognise students’ achievements and efforts through a series of Showcase Evenings, one in each College, and award evenings. The Arts Awards Evening, for example, celebrated artistic and creative talent, whilst the Sports Awards Evening celebrated individual and team successes this year. We were fortunate to have professionals join us for each of these events, with Marie Foulston from the V&A Museum and Mike Brown, England and Harlequins rugby union player, presenting awards and sharing their inspiring stories. In addition, the Summer Concert gave students a stage from which they impressed a packed audience with their talent and dedication. Breaking news: the Collegiate’ Spring 2019 musical production will be The Wizard of Oz! Look out for tickets sales after Christmas.


This year marks our school’ 60th anniversary and we were delighted to hold a special event for the occasion during the summer term. Riddlesdown High School, as it was originally called, opened in January 1958 with only 230 students and 13 teachers. Today, Riddlesdown Collegiate has almost 2000 students and 200 members of staff! The school has grown significantly over the last sixty years, but the spirit of the community remains as strong today as it always has been. On 14th July 2018, we were pleased to welcome back many former students and former members of staff to reminisce and see what our school looks like today. It was lovely to hear stories from the past and fond memories retold and our current students took real pride in showing visitors around the Collegiate and telling them about their school.   


To be kept informed of what is going on at the school, please contact alumni@riddlesdown.org with your details.  


Collegiate Report (from The Riddlesdown Recorder- Spring 2018)

Soumick Dey – Principal

As we reach the midpoint of the academic year, there has been much to celebrate at Riddlesdown Collegiate. At the time of last writing, students had just received their ALevel results – the best we have ever seen at the Collegiate – and the week after, there followed some outstanding GCSE results with a record-breaking number of top grades. Last summer was the first time that students across the country took new, more difficult, GCSEs in English and Mathematics, now graded 9-1. Whilst the national dip in results may have been expected, students at the Collegiate achieved superb results, even better than in previous year. 89% of students achieved grade 9-4 in English and 80% in Maths; 25% of all grades were at A*/A (or new grades 9-7) and students achieved 32 grade 9s in total. This level of success led to a packed hall for our annual Collegiate Celebration Evening where we recognised our highest achievers, and made for a very positive start to the new academic year.


Our open events in September attracted about 2000 visitors and students were proud to show them around the Collegiate. Two months later, we were pleased to be selected for the Croydon Secondary School of the Year Award 2017. This award came as a consequence of what we achieve with our students across the curriculum and through wider learning experiences. We have always placed a real emphasis on the importance of engaging students in activities inside and outside of the classroom that will help them to develop key skills and qualities for later life – the award recognised that and we felt privileged to have been nominated.


In December, we were delighted to receive confirmation that our application for the World Class Schools Quality Mark had been successful and that Riddlesdown Collegiate was now officially a World Class School. Application for this prestigious award is by invitation only, a prerequisite being that any potential schools must be judged to be outstanding by OFSTED (which we were in May 2016). The application and assessment processes were then entirely driven by students, the philosophy being that World Class Schools produce World Class students and so their efforts and contributions should showcase the qualities of the school – and they did! Our students are our best ambassadors and we were very proud that their work resulted in this recognition. Riddlesdown Collegiate now joins a group of just 60 top performing schools in the UK and, as always, we remain ambitious for what we will continue to achieve in the future.


A great example of the quality of our students’ talents and efforts was the Collegiate production of My Fair Lady this term. A hugely committed and brilliant cast, orchestra and technical crew of almost 200 students worked together with staff to deliver four superb performances. Audiences were blown away by the standard of what they saw and heard, with many commenting that the show was nothing like a “school play”, but much more like the West End! The performing arts at the Collegiate have been significantly enhanced following the construction of The @RC, our multi-million pound arts centre, in 2014 and, over a number of years, the Collegiate has now developed quite a reputation for excellence in the arts.


It is from the strength of Riddlesdown Collegiate that our multi-academy trust (MAT), The Collegiate Trust, has grown. The Trust also operates Gossops Green Primary School and Waterfield Primary School in Crawley, whilst The Quest Acdemy in Selsdon has been approved to join also in the coming months. At the same time, Courtwood Primary School, also in Selsdon, is currently consulting on joining too. The growth of the Trust allows greater collaboration between schools and will lead to more young people benefitting from the exceptional education that the Trust seeks to provide.


Change of times for the Collegiate day - Traffic Issues

Update 17/11/17

Following all the complaints the RRA have received from local residents since the introduction of the new Collegiate times from the beginning of September 2017, the RRA committee invited both the Chief Executive of the Collegiate Trust (Gordon Smith) and the Principal of the Collegiate (Soumick Dey) to our committee meeting last night (16/11/17). A representative from the Honister Heights Residents’ Association and Sanderstead Ward Cllr Lynne Hale were also present.

We summarise briefly a synopsis of the meeting, which lasted about an hour.

Soumick Dey explained why they have changed the Collegiate day times and why pupils are no longer allowed into the school buildings until 8am. The main reason is that some pupils were arriving from 7am (for an 8.45am start) and during the majority of that time, they were unsupervised. The teaching/support staff are not contracted to be in from 7am. The Collegiate have a duty of care for their pupils, whilst they are on the premises. Mr Dey emphasised that pupils are now allowed to wait in the front of the main building prior to 8am but are not allowed into the canteen, for those who want breakfast (or any other building) until 8am. The registration now starts at 8.30am. Mr Dey did say that before the summer of 2017, at least 90% of pupils were in the Collegiate by 8.30am and this is the main reason they brought forward the start time.

The RRA made the point that now trying to get 2,000 pupils into the school within about 30/40 minute time frame is causing huge issues for local residents and especially those who live in streets on the south side of Mitchley Ave. Some streets on the north side of Mitchley Ave have also noticed a change in traffic volumes/flows during this 30/40 minute period. The RRA advised both gentlemen that we have received a huge number of complaints and comments from local residents about this issue since the beginning of September. The RRA did stress that the Collegiate is generally held in high regard by local residents and we want to work with them to address these (and any other issues). We pointed out this traffic problem is mainly affecting residents in Honister, Grisedale Gardens and Close, Derwent and also Mitchley Hill (principally in the afternoons) where parking on both sides of the street is now occurring. However, this is not the full list of streets affected (also Ingleboro, Buttermere, and to a lesser extent, Eskdale and Dalegarth).

There are also 200 staff who work at the Collegiate and the vast majority of them drive to and from the Collegiate (which adds to traffic issues) and there is not enough parking on site for them all to park and hence the reason there is some staff on street parking in Honister Heights. This is also made worse by some 6th formers who also drive to the Collegiate and park in Honister and/or Grisedale. Very few pupils/staff cycle to school, where cycle storage facilities are available! The nearest bus route is about 600 metres away and the railway station about 1km. Some of our members have advised us that some local residents are now also parking on the streets as they were finding it very difficult to get off their driveways in the mornings and this also adds to obstruction on the highway!

One of the main issues is that the Collegiate is built at the end of a cul-de-sac and there is no way out at the other end. Unfortunately the unmade section of Dunmail Drive is privately owned and cannot be used as a one way street. The Collegiate also, cannot be held responsible for the attitude of some drivers (parents/carers) who block driveways, or drive without due consideration on local streets.

Cllr Lynne Hale asked if there is any way some supervision can be provided to allow pupils into the some of the buildings before 8am, to allow a longer time frame in the mornings for pupils to arrive. There appears to be no magic answer to this problem and we have asked the two Collegiate representatives to go away and look at all possibilities and re-assess the situation. We did not expect any answers from them last night but it was principally a meeting to express the RRA’s and in turn, residents concerns to them.

We will update more in due course.


Update 6/11/17

The Principal wrote to all parents on 3 November asking for their co-operation in dropping off their child(ren) further away from the Collegiate to avoid traffic problems in nearby streets. This is his letter.


Update 7/7/17

As the RRA had not heard anything further from Riddlesdown Collegiate about the consultation (in May) on the proposed times changes for the school day, we sent a reminder to them on 7/7/17.

We have received the following prompt response from Soumick Dey, the Principal:

"..... This week, a follow-up letter was prepared for our neighbours – perhaps this has prompted the enquiries from residents.

In terms of the Collegiate day, the key features are that from September 2017: (the school times will be)

Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 8.30am – 2.40pm

Tuesday, Thursday: 8.30am – 3.30pm


The vast majority of our students are on site before 8.30am already so formalising this start time should not make a significant difference to travel arrangements or road conditions. Meanwhile, TfL has indicated that their planning team will reflect these changes when reconsidering schedules for the autumn.

I hope that these changes will not cause inconvenience to our neighbours but wanted to make sure that you were informed – apologies again that you had not received this information sooner."


The times are slightly different to those they first suggested. It obviously remains to be seen if Tfl come up with the bus timetable changes in September, especially for the 612 (school service)!

We are also aware from the school's weekly newsletter (23/6/17) that they won't be allowing pupils into the school grounds before 8am from 10 July. So this could condense the traffic/pupil movement into a 30-40 minute period from September!

Weekly Newsletter to parents (23/6/17) on the Collegiate website:

“Parents will recall that during the recent consultation about proposed changes to the Collegiate Day from September 2017 (which have since been approved), I shared one of my concerns about some students arriving very early at school (sometimes as early as 7.00am) and consequently being unsupervised for a long time before the school day starts. It was for this reason that the suggestion of starting at 8.30am was sensible - in reality, the vast majority of students are already on site by this time. However, I remain concerned about some students arriving much earlier. Therefore, from 10th July 2017, the Collegiate site will not be open for students to access until 8.00am. This is when the breakfast service begins in The Diner and is also when the Library opens. The playgrounds are formally supervised 15 minutes before the start of the school day. I am grateful for your understanding and support with this issue - it is ultimately to promote students' safety and a positive start to the day.”


Back to Top of Page



Back to Home Page